Today, I’m focusing on the amazing, the beautiful, the somewhat rare, cane corso! 

My Other Videos

I love all dogs, but when I start talking about cane corsos, it gets personal! I own a blind cane corso named Kobe so this breed has a special place in my heart, and forever will. Kobe was a foster, then we officially adopted him. Today, he’s enjoying a life full of love, snuggles, and playtime!

Kobe the cane corso laying down

Hopefully, everyone reading this knows who Kobe is. If not, be sure to check out his post on the blog! He’s a verified superstar. Want to meet some other famous cane corsos?

Let’s Meet 5 Insta-Famous Cane Corsos

Remember: when you’re looking for a new dog, you want to do your research. Following a few accounts dedicated to the breed will give you some insight into daily life alongside the breed, and cane corsos are no different.

1. Benny

Benny the Cane Corso
Source: @bennythecorso

If you’re looking for a beautiful example of the breed, then look no further than Benny the Cane Corso! This gorgeous lad is an AKC champion, but he hasn’t let that fame go to his head. He still spends most of his time lounging in the sun and snuggling with his family.

2. Bruce Wayne & Joey Justice

A cane corso puppy
Source: @jasoncorey411

A dynamic duo with super names, Bruce and Joey are a pair of rambunctious cane corsos. Do yo u think owning one cane corso is hard? Try having two!

3. Drax

Drax the cane corso
Source: @drax_the_corso

Here’s another rambunctious pup! Meet Drax, a cane corso with 830,000 TikTok followers! While most of his antics are documented on his TikTok account, his family posts plenty of content on his Instagram account.

4. Narcos

Narco the Cane Corso with his mom
Source: @cane_corso_narcos

Narcos is a very famous pup! He spends his days in France alongside his mom, and he’s frequently posting updates to his Instagram account. However, most of his fame is from TikTok, where he boasts a whopping 3 million followers!

5. Steel and Silver

Steel & Silver the Cane Corsos
Source: @steel_silver_mahomes

This dynamic pair of cane corsos live a luxurious life alongside famous NFL quarterback Patrick Mahomes. Their daily shenanigans and nightly cuddle piles are lovingly documented on their Instagram account.

Cane Corso Basics & FAQ

Let’s start by getting a quick overview of these majestic pups.

The cane corso is an American Kennel Club recognized purebred breed. The AKC defines the breed as a gorgeous, sturdy pup with an elegant form. Historically, Cane Corsos were used as spotters when hunters were tracking difficult prey.

Cane Corsos at a Glance
Height (inches)23–28
Weight (pounds)88–110
Exercise RequirementsRegular vigorous exercise
Mental NeedsRegular training
CoatShort, double-layered
GroomingWeekly brushing
Lifespan8–12 years
TraitsLoyal, Smart, Visually stunning
Cost to Acquire$800–$6,000

Do Cane Corso Shed?

Yes! Cane corsos have a short double-layered coat, which is prone to shedding. Owners should groom their cane corsos at least once every week. These grooming sessions should focus on brushing, which helps dislodge stuck hairs and dirt, but you won’t need to worry about knots or matting.

How Big Do Cane Corsos Get?

Cane corsos are big dogs with female cane corsos growing to 23.5–26 inches tall, and male cane corsos growing to 25–28 inches tall. The weight of a pup will depend on their height, and both male and female cane corsos can weigh anywhere from 88–110 pounds, though some cane corsos have been known to get even bigger.

A cane corso dog

How Long Do Cane Corsos Live?

Cane corsos can live 8–12 years! These dogs are fairly hardy, and they have fairly long lifespans for such large pups.

If you’re thinking about buying or adopting a cane corso, you’ll want to look out for a few key issues. Like most large dogs, these pups are prone to hip problems as they age. Cane Corsos are also prone to bloat, which is a serious condition, and could impact their longevity. 

How Much is a Cane Corso Worth?

If you purchase a Cane Corso from a reputable dealer, you can expect to pay $800–$6,000. The price depends on various factors, including who the breeder is and what kind of coat your cane corso has.

How Much Exercise Does a Cane Corso Need?

Cane corsos require lots of exercise. This large breed is packed with energy, and daily walks are required to keep a cane corso happy and entertained. Ideally, you should also have a yard or space for your dog to run free (safely). If you can only dedicate an hour or two of your time every day to entertaining your pup, then the cane corso is not for you! They also need plenty of room, so apartments are not the ideal place to raise and keep a cane corso.

A Cane Corso at the beach

Cane corsos also need mental stimulation. In addition to basic obedience training, many cane corso owners enroll their pups in agility training. This gives dogs the ability to fully engage in the world around them in a healthy and safe way. To give them lots of mental stimulation at home, give them plenty of toys, puzzles, and socialization. 

How to Pronounce Cane Corso?

Cane Corso is pronounced KAH-nay CORE-so.

Is a Cane Corso a Gentle Dog?

Yes! Despite being used as hunting dogs and looking formidable, cane corsos are well known for their gentle nature. Cane corsos are loyal to their owners, and their high intelligence makes them excellent companions. Their intelligence also makes them stubborn, and they can be difficult to train without experience working with large dogs like cane corsos to avoid behavioral issues.

Is a Cane Corso a Good Family Dog?

Yes! Thanks to their docile and gentle disposition, cane corsos make wonderful family pets. However, as with any dog, you should never leave your children unsupervised with a cane corso. 

A Cane Corso with family

What 2 Breeds Make a Cane Corso?

Cane Corsos are purebred dogs, and can only be bred by breeding two purebred cane corsos. Mixed breed dogs are also awesome, they’re just not full cane corsos.

Where Can I Get a Cane Corso?

Does the cane corso sound like the perfect canine companion for you?

I think cane corsos are amazing, even if I’m a little biased. If you’re like me, then you probably want to know where to find a cane corso of your own.

In addition to the many reputable cane corso breeders across the country, you can also find cane corso specific rescues. Some of my favorites are:

11 Facts About Cane Corsos You Didn’t Know

I’ve curated a quick list of fun facts about cane corsos.

Keep reading to learn even more about this fantastic breed!

1. They’ve Fought Lions

Remember how I mentioned that Cane Corsos were once hunting dogs?

A Cane Corso & a Lion

Well, they were also fighting dogs in ancient Rome. Theories suggest that the Cane Corso was first spotted in the Tibetan Highlands, where it had happily resided for over 1,000 years. When Romans spotted these gorgeous dogs, they eagerly brought a few home. Some Cane Corsos were then put into arenas, where they fought lions.

Thankfully, cane corsos don’t need to fight anymore, and can now focus on fighting the urge to sneak treats from your plate!

2. We Almost Lost the Cane Corso Breed

Cane Corsos are becoming increasingly common, but they almost went extinct during World War II. Fortunately, breed enthusiasts banded together to salvage the breed in the 1970s.

In 1983, Società Amatori Cane Corso was founded. This group became instrumental in spreading the breed’s popularity and, in 1994, the Italian Kennel Club recognized the cane corso as its own breed. America lagged behind a bit, and cane corsos weren’t added to the official AKC list until 2010.

3. Cane Corsos Are in Many Paintings

Cane Corso in historic paintings
Source: About Time Cane Corso Italiano

Thanks to their centuries-long lineage and gorgeous silhouette, cane corsos have been favored by many painters. Bartolomeo Pinelli and Andrea Mantega are particularly famous for their cane corso art. Throughout the Italian Renaissance, cane corsos were frequently immortalized on canvas.

4. Your Insurance May Not Like Them

While cane corsos are gentle giants, not everyone sees them that way thanks to the bias against all “bully breeds.” Unfortunately, the breed has been unfairly classified as violent, and some insurances refuse to cover individuals with a cane corso.

5. Cane Corsos Have Floppy Ears

Sometimes, people tell me, “Woah! Kobe doesn’t look anything like a cane corso. Look at those floppy ears!”

Every time this happens, I get excited, because I get to teach someone something new! Cane corsos are actually born with floppy ears. However, to conform to breed standards, many pups have their ears cropped. This practice is what gives the dogs their pointed ears, but it’s highly controversial.

Personally, I’m not a fan of cropping. It’s a purely cosmetic procedure, and science has yet to find a valid reason to perform the procedure, so I say let them flop!

6. Cane Corsos Have Graced the Iron Throne

Fans of Game of Thrones are likely familiar with this breed. In the HBO version of this series, Ramsay Bolton is the proud owner of a cane corso.

7. There Are Many Famous Cane Corsos

Thanks to their gorgeous figure, cane corsos are a favored breed of the rich and famous. Television personality Sherri Shepherd has a Cane Corso, and she regularly shows her pup off online. Famed quarterback Patrick Mahomes also has a Cane Corso — two, in fact! (Keep reading to find out more about the Mahomes Corsos.)

Sherri Shepherd & her Cane Corso
Source: @sherrieshepherd

8. The Plural Is Actually “Cane Corsi”

Most people say that the plural of this breed is “cane corsos”, but that’s not exactly true. The breed’s name comes from Latin, and its meaning is generally taken to mean “bodyguard dog” or “robust dog”. Its Latin roots mean that the proper plural form of cane corso is “Cane Corsi”.

9. The Cane Corso Is a Chatterbox

It’s not an entirely unique trait, but it’s worth mentioning that cane corsos are particularly famous for their expressive voices. In addition to barking, these pups have been shown to yowl, snuffle, and make “whoo-whoo” noises.

10. Cane Corsos Are Often Mistaken for Mastiffs

Cane Corso vs English Mastiff

Thanks to their similar body type and large size, cane corsos are frequently mistaken for English mastiffs or bull mastiffs. If you see them both together, however, you’ll know which is which. Cane corsos are smaller, though not small. In fact, English Mastiffs are classified as “giant” dogs, and they can be twice the size of a full-grown cane corso!

11. Cane Corsos Come in 12 Colors

To wrap up my list of amazing cane corso facts, I’ll leave you with something neat about their double coats. These dogs come in a wide array of colors. 12 coats are recognized by breeders:

  1. Black
Black Cane Corso

2. Gray

Gray Cane Corso

3. Fawn

Fawn Cane Corso

4. Red

Red Cane Corso

5. Black brindle

Black Brindle Cane Corso

6. Gray brindle

Gray Brindle Cane Corso

7. Chestnut brindle

Chesnut Brindle Cane Corso

8. Blue

Blue Cane Corso

9. Formentino

Formentino Cane Corso

10. Chocolate or Liver

Chocolate or liver Cane Corso

11. Isabella 

Isabella Cane Corso
12. Straw
Straw Cane Corso

Learn More About Dogs

No matter what breed of dog you choose, be sure to do your research! Every dog deserves a good home, and you want to make sure that you’re ready for your canine companion before they show up.

To help you prepare, I have plenty of content on my blog to keep you informed and up to date on the latest doggy news. For more information about any dog breed, be sure to take a look at my section about different dog breeds! I even have advice on picking out treats, toys, and more!

Top Rated Dog Treats Every Dog Will Love

Jerky - Made in USA

Pumpkin Chews

Fresh Baked Daily Gourmet Treats

Animal Style Slider

      Website TERMS & CONDITION

      ENTERTAINMENT AND INFORMATION ONLY – NOT VETERINARY CARE

      Kanaka Holdings operates an online information and opinion blog and is for educational and entertainment purposes only. Reading this website or using any of the information you expressly acknowledge and understand that there are risks and limitations associated with any advice, recipes, formulas, products given.

      The blog is NOT a substitute for veterinary care, advice, facts or opinions, and we cannot provide advice or consultation regarding such. If your pet is sick, injured, or in need of medical attention, please contact your regular veterinarian or local emergency animal hospital immediately.

      The contents of the Rocky Kanaka website, such as text, graphics, images, and other material contained on the Site (“Content”) are for informational and entertainment purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional veterinary advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your veterinarian or other qualified provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on the Site.

      READ AND USE OF THIS SITE IS AT YOUR OWN RISK

      ROCKY KANAKA / KANAKA HOLDINGS OR ITS EMPLOYEES ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY LOSS, INJURY, CLAIM, LIABILITY, OR DAMAGE RELATED TO YOUR USE OF THIS SITE OR ANY SITE LINKED TO THIS SITE, WHETHER FROM ERRORS OR OMISSIONS IN THE CONTENT OF OUR SITE OR ANY OTHER LINKED SITES, FROM THE SITE BEING DOWN, OR FROM ANY OTHER USE OF THIS SITE.